Sunday, 7 January 2018

"Watch out guv, 'es got an annual!"

I suspect that some Found Objects partisans might be interested in a set of scans from the 1978 Sweeney annual, which I posted this morning on my own blog, so just thought I'd do a quick post to alert them.

Featuring amongst other things: a photograph of Dennis Waterman being hit in the knackers with a two by four, and a pin-up of an exuberant John Thaw holding what looks like a choc-ice. As is only right and proper.

Saturday, 6 January 2018

CLEAR CHANNEL III


Vatican Shadow - Desert Storm (Waco) (Hospital Productions)
The Chi Factory - The Bamboo Recordings (Astral Industries)
Oliver Coates - Memorial to Hitchens (Prah Recordings)
Ataraxia - Sorcerer (RCA)
Rollo Smallcombe - Inferno (unreleased)
Electric Sewer Age - Moon’s Milk (Waning) (Soleilmoon Recordings)
Rabit - Possessed (Halcyon Veil)
Geinoh Yamashirogumi - Requiem (Milan)
Dao De Noize - Droning Voices From the Past (Lamour)
Death In June - Death of a Man (NER)
Nokuit - Patterns of Instability I (NKT)
Frans Zwartjes - Living (Not on label)
J.G. Biberkopf - Spirit (Knives)
Memotone - Ritual (Black Acre)
Abel Korzeniowski - Exhibition (Back Lot Music)
Fis - Sub Larynx (Loopy)
Jed Kurzel - The Med Bay (Milan)
3.14 - Ironas (Autumn Equinox Edition)
Horoscope - Azabache Necklace Brought to Protect My Daughter (Wharf Cat Records)
Clint Mansell - Waves Crashing on Distant Shores of Time (Lakeshore Records)
Himukalt - Repairing Her Own Space (Angst Records)
Cyclobe - We’ll Witness the Resurrection of Dead Butterflies (Three Moons) (Phantomcode)
Gagarin Kombinaatti - Survos (Sahko Recordings)
Killing Sound - Eight Methods (Blackest Ever Black)
Abigail Mead - Sniper (Warner Bros. Records)
Thomas Nöla et son Orchestre ft. Douglas P. - The Constables (Caciocavallo)
Jason Lescalleet - Nice Ass (Glistening Examples)
Christophe Guiraud - A B E L (Sub Rosa)
Undweld - False Mirages (Perfect Aesthetics)
Dedekind Cut - So Far, So Good (Ninja Tune)

Friday, 29 December 2017

Working Man's Soul



"What a belter! This is one groovy, hipshaking mother of an album. These are gritty, honest records. Dripping in Brut 33, bad shirt and ties, dodgy beer stained carpets and boozy Friday nights 'down the club'. Very funky. Great for a party and a laugh...see you there!!! Working Man's Soul celebrates the forgotten world of cabaret performers from the 1960s and 70s and selects the cream of the funky club cuts unearthed from records only previously available on private pressings. Manufactured by the artists themselves in miniscule quantities, these records were sold only at live performances in socia clubs, miner's welfare clubs and working men's clubs across the UK. The compilation covers everything from soul, funk and jazz to rock and easy listening. Jazz standards given a bit of extra pep sit next to funky filmic big band numbers, while Hammond players show off their chops, guitarists give their plank a spank, vocalists belt it out good and proper and even the drummer gets a chance for a solo. The common theme here is a strong groove designed to keep a busy dancefloor moving: After all, this is music written to be performed down the Social to celebrate the good times and the end of the working week! The records from which these tracks are taken have been unearthed by Licorice Soul over many years of persistent (and usually fruitless) searching at flea markets, car boot sales, charity shops, and even the odd proper second hand record shop. The majority of these tracks are here made commercially available for the very first time, each brings with it its own story of success, failure, or years of simply hoping, and in its own unique way, evokes the golden age of the British club circuit."

from the liner notes to Working Man's Soul Vol. 1, on Licorice Soul label, 2009






Thursday, 28 December 2017

Prospective 21e Siècle


                                     
                                      







                                           

                                           







                                            

                                    








                                            






























                                            






Prospective 21e Siècle sleeves were "manufactured using “Procédé Heliophore”  - a technique originally developed in the 1930s by Louis Defay to transform aluminum paper for printing" (Discogs). But nobody seems to know the names of the designer or designers, who were uncredited. 

Marring the immaculate and relentless silver-ness of the imprint trajectory, splashes of colour: 

                                      

                                          








Some kind of catalogue